Events

17.06.2017

Sydney Film Festival - Meet the Directors Podcast

The podcast of the 'Meet the Directors - Stories of Refugees and Forced Migrations' event at the Sydney Film Festival is now available at the following link:

https://soundcloud.com/unsw-arts-social-sciences/sff-meet-the-directors-stories-of-refugees-and-forced-migration

Speakers 

Directors: Arash Kamali Sarvestani and and Behrouz Boochani (Chauka: Please tell us the time) and Su Goldfish (The Last Goldfish)

Facilitator: Stephanie Hemelryk Donald

Two films, two journeys, and two stunning cinematic voices that remind us how close all of us are to the terrifying uncertainty of being a refugee. Behrouz Boochani is a Kurdish-Iranian journalist, whose incarceration on Manus island has not silenced his professional commitment to telling us mainlanders what he sees, what he knows, and why it is our responsibility to change things for the better, but whose life is otherwise, excruciatingly, on hold. Su is an Australian woman discovering the traumatic forced migration of her father, and the impact of that knowledge on her own sense of being. In these films, there is a sense that the true complexities life must be acknowledged and faced, if the world, and perhaps especially for these films, Australia, is to find its own road home.

Each story of forced migration is a story about all of us, the world we inhabit and the worlds we make one with another. The films explore the central contradiction of life – it is long, various and horribly short. The voice of the refugee is the sound of human life speaking aloud – demanding the basics of a complex life: time, history, and enduring relationships with other people. These film-makers remind us how close we all are to the precariousness of conflict, and the possible agony of leaving home. 

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18.05.2017

Symposium - Child and Nation in the Context of World Cinema

Prof. Donald will present on research developed from her recent book with Emma Wilson and Sara Wright, Childhood and Nation in Contemporary World Cinema (2017, Bloomsbury) and her forthcoming monograph There's No Place Like Home: Child Migrants in World Cinema (2017, IB Tauris).  

Her paper will consider ways in which childhood is produced on screen, and how the idea of 'child life' might support an analysis of film.

When: 16 June 2017, 1.30pm - 6pm

Where: Communication and Visual Arts, HK Baptist University.

Register by email: mmclau@hkbu.edu.au 

Download invitation here

 

June Symposium HK

 

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14.03.2017

The Theo Angelopoulos Symposium

Theo Angelopoulos Symposium Poster

 

Program

April 18

19.00 Wine reception at the Norwegian Institute

April 19

09.45 Welcome and Coffee

10.00 Angelos Koutsourakis, University of Leeds, "Angelopoulos and the Persistence of Modernism"

11.00 Panayiota Mini, University of Crete, "Angelopoulos's Greece"

11.45 Asbjørn Grønstad, University of Bergen, "Angelopoulos, Akomfrah, and 'The Elsewhere of the Image’"

12.30 Lunch

14.00 Stephanie Hemelryk Donald, University of New South Wales, "Children and European Mobility: Visions of Now in the Films of Angelopoulos"

14.45 Øyvind Vågnes, University of Bergen, "Never at Rest Until It Unites With the Sea: Water in the Trilogy of Borders"

15.30 Mark Ledbetter, University of Bergen, "The Not So 'Solid State' of Surround Sound: Making Meaning in Mono in Angelopoulous’s Eternity and a Day"

18.00 Andrew Horton & Elly Petrides in Conversation

20.00 Dinner

Download a printable version of the program, with directions to the venue and hotel here.

 

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19.02.2017

Films For Now - screenings at the Refugee Alternatives Conference

Films for now

Curated by Stephanie Hemelryk Donald

Wednesday 22 February | 10.00am – 4.00pm and Thursday 23 February | 10.00am – 4.00pm

Ainsworth Building, UNSW (Map Ref J17)

The Refugee Alternatives Conference will be screening shorts, screen artworks, and feature-length films that address the conditions, hopes, issues and challenges of forced migration in the twenty-first century. Many have been made by people who are themselves refugees, or who have first-hand experience of a difficult migration. Other are by artists and film-makers who engage with the centrality of forced migration to the human condition. Films address the reasons people may (or may not) leave their homes, the enormous hopes and struggles that such journeys entail, and the real dangers that national and supra-national border controls present. We also include works that look at the results of displacement, being out of place can produce loneliness, uncertainty and a sense of missing out on a life well lived, of waiting to start again but not knowing how or when. The films will run across the two days of the conference in a special screening room, titles will be distributed on the day and where possible we will invite a film-maker to introduce the works shown. No bookings required for conference delegates, just come along.

Click here for program and more details.

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03.02.2017

Conference - Refugee Alternatives: improving policy, practice and public support

Refugee Alternatives: improving policy, practice and public support

Date: 22-23 February

Ainsworth Building, UNSW

This two day conference, in conjunction with UNSW, will bring together a broad range of expertise covering topics of displacement; protection; cooperation; wellbeing; resilience; education; advocacy; and unity. 

Register here.

View program here. www.refugeealternatives.org.au/program/conference-timetable/

As part of the Conference Stephanie will be curating 'Films for Now', screenings of shorts, artworks and feature-length films, on both evenings of the conference. Click here for more details.

Refugee Alternatives Save the Date

 

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03.02.2017

Symposium: Affective Shifts Inside and Outside the Nation and Body

Affective Shifts Inside and Outside the Nation and Body: Rethinking how Refugee Research is Engendered

Date: 21st February 2017, 9.00am to 5.00pm

Venue: UNSW Art & Design Campus, Lecture Theatre EG02, Paddington, Sydney

Download program here.

This Academic Symposium is an attempt to rethink how to analyse the spaces and socialites of our lives with a focus on research with refugees and asylum seekers. It will aim to highlight how relationships that break down perceived boundaries of researcher and researched engender a different politics of affirmation with which the current tenor of public debate on refugees can be challenged.

Register here.

Exit
There will be a live performance at 5pm and a special viewing of the EXIT installation at the UNSW Galleries. For free registration RSVP to unswgalleries@unsw.edu.au

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20.11.2016

Keynote - The Annual Conference of Youth Studies

The conference aims at critical discussion about the global responsibility of youth research. The focus of youth studies will be challenged by questioning the geographical emphasis and methodological premises of Western youth studies. The key issues addressed in the conference will include youth radicalization, issues related to the young asylum seekers in Europe, as well as the everyday life and the future opportunities of young people living in conflict- and crisis-affected regions. In the globalized world both ideas and people move across borders. The conference will also pay attention to the effects of global dynamics in Europe.

For more information, click here: http://www.youthresearch.fi/research/the-annual-conference-of-youth-studies/keynote-speakers

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19.07.2016

Book launch - Markets, Places, Cities by Kirsten Seale

Stephanie Donald will launch Kirsten Seale's Markets, Places, Cities, published by Routledge, at UTS Design this Thursday.

When: 21 July, 4.30pm to 6.30pm

Where: Room 6.38, Level 6, Building 6, UTS 702 Harris Street Ultimo, Sydney

Markets Places Cities flyer

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04.07.2016

Book Launch: Tom Cliff: 'Oil and Water: Being Han in Xinjiang'

Oil and Water Image

Professor Stephanie Hemelryk-Donald and Professor Martyn Jolly will launch Oil and Water: Being Han in Xinjiang by Dr Thomas Cliff at the exhibition of the same name, currently showing at the Australian National University, Canberra.

When: Tuesday 5 July, 3.30pm

Where: Photospace Gallery, ANU School of Art, Level 2 (Directly upstairs from Childers St entrance). 2 Childers St, Acton ACT 2601

The exhibition is part of a research project, including Dr Cliff's book, published by the University of Chicago press, into the experiences of Han people in Xinjiang, China. It is showing until 8 July.

From Village to City: Social Transformation in a Chinese County Seat by Professor Andrew Kipnis launched by Professor Jonathan Unger and Dr Assa Doron.

 

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17.04.2016

Childhood & Nation in World Cinema Conference

The last event for the Childhood and Nation in World Cinema Network will take place on 18 April at Royal Holloway, Morre Building (12 on Campus Map).

Breakfast for those staying on capus will take place in the Founders Hall at 7.30 - 9.00am

Registration 9.30 - 10.00am in the Moore Building Atrium.

Download conference schedule here

Download abstracts here

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01.11.2015

Arts and Sciences Forum ‘The Creative Process’

Leverhulme Artist in Residence Presentation

Chaired by Head of School of Arts Professor Stephanie Hemelryk Donald

Scientists and artists drawn from across the University and the City of Liverpool will each speak about the creative process involved in their own research. Students and staff from all disciplines are warmly invited to join the discussion about how different approaches in science and art really are, and what each might learn from the other. Panel members: Dr Rachel Bearon (Mathematical Biologist), Professor Mathias Brust (Chemist), Dr Ben Hackbarth (Composer), Professor Rodi Herzberg (Physicist), Dr Emily Howard (Composer), Professor Tim Jones (Theoretical Physicist), Dr Anna Pratoussevitch (Pure Mathematician), Professor Deryn Rees-Jones (Poet), Dr Gary Seiffert (Acoustician), Imogen Stidworthy (Visual Artist).

When: 17 November 2015, 2-4pm

Where: The Risk Institute, The Chadwick Building, University of Liverpool

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28.09.2015

Free public lecture - Imagining the future: The impact of creative technology on society

Tuesday 13 October 2015, 5.30pm
The Leggate Theatre, Victoria Gallery & Museum, University of Liverpool
(Building 421 on the Campus Map)

Professor Dennis Del Favero
Redefining interactive narrative for the digital era. Professor Dennis Del Favero is an Australian Research Council Professorial Fellow and artistwhose work has been widely exhibited in leading museums such as the Sprengel Museum in Hanover, Germany, and the Neue Gallerie Graz in Austria. His work has focused on interactive technology.
 
Jim Eyre OBE
Bridging art and science. In his long experience in architectural practice, Liverpool graduate Jim Eyre (LLD 2009) has been involvedin a diverse range of project types at all stages of the design and construction process. His roles include key conceptual design on projects ranging from the Gateshead Millennium Bridge to the Cooled Conservatories at Gardens by the Bay in Singapore, to the New Bodleian Library in Oxford. He has a particular interest in multi-disciplinary projects where architectural creativity and engineering principles can be combined.
 
Professor Stephi Hemelryk Donald

Overview technology as art: visualisation, connection and imagination. Professor Stephanie Hemelryk Donald is a respected international scholar. She was educated in the UK and in Singapore. Her research covers film, the media, and children’s experiences in the Asia-Pacific region, with a particular focus on visual culture.
 
Book your free tickets on the website:
http://www.liv.ac.uk/events/science-and-society/

 

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24.08.2015

CFAC Public Lecture - University of Reading

Diamonds of the Night: Childhood Loneliness in World Cinema

28 October 2015 - 6pm - Bulmershe Theatre, University of Reading

Prof Hemelryk Donald's will discuss the sounds of a child's loneliness in film. Her paper draws specifically on films treating the child in accelerated motion, whether in flight from immediate danger or in search of home, a new home or a return to a previous environment. Part of a larger project on the child migrant, this paper attempts to hear how sound or its absence provokes the sense of loneliness in cinema, and discusses how this impacts the wider notion of cinematic childishness and maturation. Dealing with questions of presence and absence, with space and frame, and with youth and ageing, it aims to contribute to a review of twentieth century postwar thematics of childhood in a twenty-first century crisis of child migration.

Click here to view more details on the University of Reading event page.

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25.03.2015

Registration now open: Libidinal Circuits

Registration for Libidinal Circuits Conference: Scenes of Urban Innovation III, to be held at University of Liverpool from Wednesday 8 July to Friday 10 July 2015 is now open.

All tickets are available through Eventbrite:

Faculty | Directors | £140 IASCC Fee £20

Students | Artists | Independent Scholars | Adjunct | £55 IASCC Fee £10

Regular Registration Fees – After June 1, 2015


Faculty | Directors | £160 IASCC Fee £20

Students | Artists | Independent Scholars | Adjunct | £65  IASCC Fee £10

Contact: info@cultureofcities.com

Click here to go to the Eventbrite registration page now

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02.02.2015

CFP: Libidinal Circuits: Scenes of Urban Innovation III

The Centre for Architecture and Visual Arts (CAVA), the School of the Arts, University of Liverpool, the Foundation for Art and Creative Technology (FACT) and the Culture of Cities Centre are pleased to announce the 3rd Annual Conference of the International Association for the Study of the Culture of Cities (IASCC), Libidinal Circuits: Scenes of Urban Innovation III.

When: July 8-10 2015

Where: University of Liverpool, England

Closing date for abstracts/art proposals: 15 March 2015

How can art and advanced theory make reference to the libidinal circuit of the city, its sensuality, desire, hallucinations and its rationality, fears and transgressions? We invite papers and presentations that deal with innovation and its tensions between progress and recalcitrance, of imaginary conceptions of time, space, fluidity and inertia. The aim of this conference is to open up the urban circuits of desire and to analyze the allegiances and fractures of urban life and the special role that art and the artist plays in rendering and intervening in this system.

Art Submissions and small-practice based works are welcome. We are pleased to announce that  FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology), UK’s leading media arts centre, based in Liverpool is a partner in the programing of the exhibitions, film and   participant-led art projects.

Contact: info@cultureofcities.com

Go to conference website: www.cultureofcities.com

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10.09.2014

Inert Cities Book Launch!

inert citiesInert Cities: Globalization, Mobility and Suspension in Visual Culture, edited by Stephanie H Donald and Christoph Lindner - to be launched in October by I B Tauris and the Amsterdam Centre for Globalization Studies

When: 9 October 2014, 5.30pm

Where: University Theatre Foyer, Niewe Doelenstraat 16-18, Amsterdam

Click here to download invitation

We usually associate contemporary urban life with movement and speed. But what about those instances when the forms of mobility associated with globalized cities – the flow of capital, people, labour and information – freeze or decelerate? How can we assess the impact of suspension on a city? What does valuing stillness mean in regards to the forward march of globalization? When does inertia presage decay, and when does it promise immanence and rebirth?
 
Bringing together original contributions by international specialists from the fields of architecture, photography, film, sociology and cultural analysis, this cutting-edge book considers the poetics and politics of inertia in cities ranging from Amsterdam, Berlin, Beirut and Paris, to Beijing, New York, Sydney and Tokyo. Chapters explore what happens when photography, film, mixed media works, architecture and design intervene in cities to disrupt speed and movement; and question the degree to which mobility is aspirational or imaginary, absolute or transient. Together, they encourage a re-assessment of what it means to be urban in an unevenly globalizing world, to live in cities built around mythologies of perpetual progress. These new analyses of visual culture’s strategic interruptions in global cities allow a more in-depth understanding of the new forms of space, experience, and community that are emerging in today’s rapidly transforming urban environments.

Click here to view contents

Click here to download IB Taurus book discount voucher

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05.08.2014

Affective Cities: Scenes of Innovation II

When: August 5-7 2014

Where: 720 Bathurst St. W., Suite 321 (Centre for Social Innovation Annex Building) Toronto, ON M5S 2R5 CANADA

Stephanie will be presenting a paper 'Forced Inertia: Mobility, Interruption, and Stasis' on day three of IASCC 2014.

This year’s conference Affective Cities: Scenes of Innovation II is the second annual meeting of The International Association for the Study of the Culture of Cities (IASCC). The conference events are hosted by The Culture of Cities Centre (CCC) at The Centre for Social Innovation and are produced in partnership with York University, and the University of Waterloo.

The Culture of Cities Centre is celebrating its fourteenth year and is active in engaging local and international academic scholars, artists and social entrepreneurs in the interdisciplinary study of culture and the city. The Affective Cities conference includes diverse paper presentations, panels and social activities organized around theoretic and applied practices across a range of disciplines in the social sciences, humanities and fine arts.

Click here to download the program.

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16.07.2014

Symposium, Childhood and Nation in World Cinema: Borders and Encounters Since 1980

When: 28 Jul 2014, 6:30pm - 8:30pm; 29 Jul 2014, 9am - 5pm; 30 Jul 2014, 9am - 7:30pm
Where:   Peter Farrell Room, John Niland Scientia Building, UNSW Kensington. View map (ref G19)
Registration: By invitation only

Contact: Contact: Stefan Solomon - s.solomon@unsw.edu.au

This symposium brings together an international network of scholars in order to address questions of the child and nation in the context of world cinemas. On the one hand, understanding cinematic representations of the child has been an important recent trend in film studies. On the other, the scholarly study of national cinema now appears to be on the wane, with serious concerns over the status of the nation as a meaningful cultural unit. What, then, might the two - childhood and nation - say about one another?

Taking as their points of departure the series of traumatic global shifts in the 1980s, the papers at this symposium will map the coordinates of childhood across different contemporary national cinemas, and assess whether the cinematic child is indeed aligned to concepts of modern nationhood, to concerns of the State, and to geopolitical organizational themes and precepts.

This event, under the auspices of the Leverhulme Network ‘Child, Film, Nation’, is made possible with the generous support of the Leverhulme Trust and the Australian Research Council.

ARC Leverhulme

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16.07.2014

Symposium opening and film screening: Childhood and Nation

When: Monday 28 July, 2014; screening and director Q +A: 6.30pm - 8.30pm

Where: Room 327, Robert Webster Building, UNSW Kensington (view map: ref G14)
Campus map: view

Registration: Required - RSVP Here

Contact: Stefan Solomon  s.solomon@unsw.edu.au

As the opening event of the symposium, ‘Childhood and Nation in World Cinema: Borders and Encounters Since 1980,’ members of the Leverhulme Network, ‘Child, Film, Nation’ cordially invite you to a screening of the major new Australian film, 52 Tuesdays (2013). After its international successes earlier this year at Sundance and the Berlinale, 52 Tuesdays has been recently released to great critical acclaim in Australia. The director, Sophie Hyde, will introduce her film, and will be available afterwards to answer questions about its unique production process.

Synopsis: 16-year-old Billie's reluctant path to independence is accelerated when her mother reveals plans to gender transition and their time together becomes limited to Tuesday afternoons. Filmed over the course of a year, once a week, every week - only on Tuesdays - these unique filmmaking rules bring a rare authenticity to this emotionally charged exploration of desire, responsibility and transformation.

52 tuesdays

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16.07.2014

Postgraduate Masterclass: Child, Film, Nation

The child exists in cinema and has done so since the Lumière Brothers filmed their babies having messy meals in Lyons, but it is only quite recently that scholars have paid serious attention to her/his presence on screen. The range and quality of scholarly discussion is now of the highest quality and of the greatest interest to anyone concerned with the extent to which adult cultural conversations invoke the figure of the child.

As part of the Leverhulme Network, ‘Child, Film, Nation’, a Postgraduate Masterclass will take place on 31 July at the University of New South Wales. Here, graduate students working in film studies, or those whose research focuses on the figure of the child in visual culture more broadly, will have the unique opportunity to work with experienced scholars in the field. Visiting academics, Professor Emma Wilson (Cambridge) and Dr Sarah Wright (RHUL), will be on hand to discuss students’ thesis research, and will provide expert advice on the topic of children in cinema.

Network partners

Dr Sarah Wright

Dr Sarah Wright
Royal Holloway, University of London

Prof. S H Donald
Professor Stephanie Hemelryk Donald
University of New South Wales

Prof. Emma Wilson
Professor Emma Wilson
University of Cambridge


Dr Zitong Qiu
Ningbo Institute of Technology, Zhejiang University

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10.07.2014

So, What? Lecture Series: There's No Place Like Home

When: 30 July 2014, 6pm for 6.30pm

Where: Tyree Room, John Niland Scientia Building, UNSW, Kensington (Map ref G19)

RSVP essential. Register here.

Stephanie will present 'There's no place like home: child migrants in world cinema' for the UNSW lecture series So, what? Public Lectures in contemporary humanities and social sciences.

The lecture looks at how the child migrant has figured in world cinema since 1939, and argues that the child retains a special power in describing, performing and critiquing the great movements and translations that make the world global.

The lecture will also be the keynote for the Symposium on Child, Nation and World Cinema, which opens on 28 July with a screening of Sophie Hyde's film 52 Tuesdays (2013).

Dorothy Gale%2C The Wizard of Oz

 

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09.07.2014

Seminar: Are we winning the battle against HIV and AIDS?

Date: Wednesday 16 July 2014
Time: 10.30am – 11.30am
Location: Room 221, John Goodsell Building, UNSW Kensington
Campus map: view.
Map reference: F20
 
Registration: Required - click here to register 

Lord Norman Fowler

The Right Honourable Lord Norman Fowler, House of Lords

This seminar will be introduced by Professor Stephanie Hemelryk Donald, ARC Professorial Future Fellow & Distinguished Professor, UNSW iCinema Research Centre

Abstract: In the last two years Lord Fowler has been around the world from Uganda and South Africa to Russia and Ukraine, and from New Delhi and Washington, to London and Sydney. So far we have lost 35 million dead and currently there are around 35 million people living with HIV. Even worse, half those living with HIV are undiagnosed. One of the reasons for this is that people are not prepared to come forward for testing if they know they are going to be prosecuted, ostracised by their family, or discriminated against at work. The question then becomes whether we can win with this barrier of prejudice and discrimination.
 
Bio: Norman Fowler was a member of Margaret Thatcher’s cabinet for eleven years and was Health Secretary in the United Kingdom when the AIDS crisis first became evident in the 1980s. He was responsible for the ‘Don’t Die of Ignorance’ campaign in London which used television and all the media to warn the public. He has remained active in this area since then and has just published a book – ‘AIDS: Don’t Die of Prejudice – which is based on visits to nine cities around the world.

Light refreshments will be served before and after the seminar to allow for informal discussion.

Contact:
Centre for Social Research in Health
e: csrh@unsw.edu.au
t: (02) 9385 6776

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08.05.2014

Jiawei Shen: His Mother's Voice

The performance of His Mother's Voice (Bakehouse Theatre Co.)  this Sunday 11th May  at 5pm at the Wharf (Atyp space), will be followed by some reflections by Chinese scholars on the Cultural Revolution period. (Yi Zheng UNSW, Yingjie Guo UTS, Stephi Hemelryk Donald UNSW)
Do join us for the show and a chat and a glass ...

His Mother's Voice

ATYP Bookings

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08.05.2014

WILLIAM WRIGHT ARTISTS PROJECTS: Dennis Del Favero

FIREWALL: Dennis Del Favero

Dennis Del Favero

8th - 31st  May 2014  6- 9 pm
 
91 STANLEY STREET EAST SYDNEY 2010
PH: 0404 904 609   E: ww.artistsprojects@mac.com
W: wiliamwrightartists.com.au
Wednesday - Thursday by Appointment 1:00 - 6:00
Open Friday - Saturday 12:30 - 6:00

Catalogue essay by Stephanie Hemelryk Donald. Read essay here.

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19.03.2014

Global Cities and Practices of Interruption Symposium

When: 22-23 May 2014

Where: Sen Ting Lee Seminar Room, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Stephanie will be presenting a paper entitled 'Children in War Photography: Loss, Mourning and Interruption' at this two-day symposium at the University of London.

The full programme can be downloaded here.

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03.03.2014

There's no place like home: Child migrants in world cinema

So What? Lecture - UNSW Arts & Social Sciences

When: 30 July 2014, 6pm - 7.30pm

Where: Tyree Room, John Niland Scientia Building, UNSW Kensington (map ref G19)

RSVP: click here to go to UNSW page to RSVP

In a world maimed by war, climate change, economic dysfunction and political failures, the flows of migration are as intense as they have ever been. Child migrants are central actors in this movement of people across borders and continents. As those in receiving countries such as Australia know well, however, the child migrant is not always kindly greeted on arrival.

As recently as November 2012, the current Minister for Immigration commented that 'It doesn't matter whether you're a child, ... it doesn't matter whether you're an unaccompanied minor, it doesn't matter whether you have a health condition, ... if you're fit enough to get on a boat, you're fit enough to ... end up in offshore processing'. Is this the only way to think about journeys, arrivals and settlement?

The lecture looks at how the child migrant has figured in world cinema since 1939, and argues that the child retains a special power in describing, performing and critiquing the great movements and translations that make the world global.

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29.01.2014

Modern Languages and Film Studies: The Border Film

This one-day colloquium is the final event in the AHRC-funded Skills Development project at the Institute for Modern Languages Research at the University of London's School of Advanced Study.

When: Friday 31 January 2014, 9.30am to 5pm
Where: Rm 103, Senate House, Malet St, London WC1E 7HU

Programme:

9.30 Tea & Coffee.
 
10.00 The Border Film: Téchiné in Tangier (Bill Marshall).
 
An illustrated talk followed by discussion. For further reading, see:
P.Pisters, 'Filming the times of Tangier: nostalgia, postcolonial agency, and preposterous history', in: D. Iordanova, D. Martin-Jones, B. Vidal (eds.). Cinema at the Periphery. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2010, pp. 175-189.
 
11.00 Student-led discussions on border films. Suggested viewing:
 
Bon Cop Bad Cop/Good Cop Bad Cop (Erik Canuel, 2006).
Loin/Far (Andre Techine, 2001).
Die Mitte/The Centre (Stanislaw Mucha, 2004).
Rien À Déclarer/Nothing to Declare (Dany Boon, 2010).
Les Temps qui changent/Changing Times (André Téchiné, 2004).
Touch of Evil (Orson Welles, 1958).
 
12.30 Lunch
 
14.00 (Chair, Erica Carter, KCL). Professor Stephanie Hemelryk Donald from the University of New South Wales, an expert on Chinese and also migrant cinema, will give a talk and lead seminar discussions on films such as:
 
Landscape in the Mist (Theo Angelopoulos, 1988).
Le Havre (Aki Kaurismäki, 2011).
Lore (Cate Shortland, 2012).
Welcome (Philippe Lioret, 2009).
 
16.00 An hour-long discussion on'where we go from here': how to keep a Modern Languages and Film PG network going, publication possibilities, etc..
 
17.00 Colloquium ends.

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12.11.2013

History as Form: A Symposium on Theo Angelopoulos

This symposium has been organized by the UNSW Centre for Modernism Studies in Australia as a celebration of the great European auteur, Theo Angelopoulos, who died last year.

Speakers will explore Angelopoulos’ persistent belief in art cinema narration as a form of resistance, and will identify the various ways that form and history engage one another. Individual papers will discuss the historical dimension of form, the formal dimension of history, and the philosophical questions raised by Angelopoulos’ films.

Stephanie Hemelryk Donald will present a paper in the first panel, entitled  ‘Landscape in the Mist: Encounters on the road - pensivity, contemplation and thinking aloud.’

When: Thursday, 28 November 2013, 9am - 5pm

Where: UNSW, Robert Webster Building, Cinema room 327

Click here to visit the symposium website, and full program details.

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30.10.2013

Mediated Power: Europe and Asia Compared

Can Asian and European countries learn from each other, how dangerous is mediated power today and how can things be changed to ensure a brighter future?

These are the key questions that will be addressed in the first round-table event of the Festival of Democracy at the University of Sydney.

Stephanie and her UNSW colleague Martin Krygier will join Miklos Sukosd (University of Hong Kong), James Gomez (University Utara Malaysia), Jan Zielonka (University of Oxford), Andrew Jaspan (The Conversation), Chee Soon Juan (Singapore Democratic Party), Connie Levett (Sydney Morning Herald),  John Keane, Benedetta Brevini, Peter Fray and Giovanni Navarria (University of Sydney) to examine in detail how the clever political exploitation of media in countries like Hungary, Italy and Russia subverts the foundations of democracy and how the strikingly similar strategies employed in some Asian authoritarian regimes, like Singapore, China and Malaysia, have crucially influenced European realities.

When: 5-7.30pm, Tuesday 5 November 2013

Where: Senate Room, Lobby Q, The Quadrangle Building, University of Sydney (click here for interactive campus map)

Seats are limited and registration essential. RSVP to ihdr@sydney.edu.au

Download the full program here, or visit the Festival website at http://sydney.edu.au/arts/idhr/news_events/festival-of-democracy.shtml

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30.10.2013

University of Sydney Festival of Democracy

The Festival of Democracy is a five-day carnival of talks, lectures, workshops, art and photography probing and debating the latest scholarly thinking and practical developments concerning the present and highly uncertain future of democracy.

When: Tuesday 5 November - Saturday 9 November 2013

Where:  The University of Sydney

The event is open to the public, and reservations are essential for each event. Stephanie will be speaking at the first event, Mediated Power: Europe and Asia Compared.

Download the full program here, or visit the Festival website at http://sydney.edu.au/arts/idhr/news_events/festival-of-democracy.shtml

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09.10.2013

Post / Socialist / Modernism round table at UNSW

Next week sees an exciting special event, a once-off Round Table on Post / Socialist / Modernism. The session will feature five panelists, each of whom will deliver a brief position paper focused on a key text or artwork. These have been chosen to focus our thinking about the relations between socialism and modernism across the twentieth century and across the globe. A moderated discussion between the panelists will follow these introductions, after which there will be time for questions from the audience.

When:  Wednesday 16 October 2013, 4.00 pm - 6.30 pm

Where: Rm 139, Webster Building, UNSW (click here for campus map)

The five panelists and their papers are:

Yi Zheng (UNSW): "Reviving War in Magic Post-socialist Modernism: Mo Yan's Red Sorghum"
Angelos Koustourakis (UNSW): "Beyond Orthodoxy: Rethinking Luk¨¢cs's writings on film realism"
Ying Qian (ANU): "Between Taylorism and Revolutionary Romanticism: Modernism in China's Great Leap Forward"
Robert Buch (UNSW): "Heiner Miller: The Road of Tanks"
Stephanie Hemelryk-Donald (UNSW): "Visualising Modern Cities and Modern Thinking in the Work of Liu Dahong"

All welcome!

Post / Socialist /Modernism poster

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09.09.2013

Workshop on research in contemporary China

What is fieldwork and who does it? Why is it necessary and what are its limitations? The panel represents research practices ranging from social studies, policy studies, empirical humanities and anthropology, and discusses both the precepts and the expectations within which field work is designed and implemented. The researchers are all closely engaged with specific Asian subject matters and population groups, although their work may be of relevance and import to both regional (pan-Asian) and global questions and problems. We will bring issues of access, ethics, researcher-status, language and politics to this roundtable, seeking to cross-reference and compare experiences, best practice and protocols.

Stephanie Hemelryk Donald, Presenter and Chair
(School of Humanities and Languages UNSW)
This presentation will discuss incommensurability between actors in the field, with special reference to the Paiwand Film Club. (2013)
Katrina Moore(School of Social Sciences UNSW)
This paper is a reflection on the experiences of conducting extended fieldwork and the challenges of sustaining a critical distance from those whom we study, come to respect, and sometimes even to like.
Gerard Goggin (University of Sydney)
 
Xiaoyuan Shang and Karen Fisher(Social Policy Research Centre, UNSW)
This presentation will discuss how to conduct fieldwork in China successfully.

For more information please click here

Date: Thursday 12 September, 2013
Time: 11:30am - 2:00pm
Presentations: 11.30am – 112.50pm
Workshop discussion & lunch: 12.50pm – 2.00pm
 
Location: Room 119, GGoodsell Building, UNSW Kensington
Campus map: view
Map reference: F20

Registration: Attendance is free but places at the workshop are limited.  To attend please register with the School of Humanities & Languages by email by Monday 9 September.

e:hal@unsw.edu.au
t: (02) 9385 1681

What is fieldwork and who does it? Why is it necessary and what are its limitations? The panel represents research practices ranging from social studies, policy studies, empirical humanities and anthropology, and discusses both the precepts and the expectations within which field work is designed and implemented. The researchers are all closely engaged with specific Asian subject matters and population groups, although their work may be of relevance and import to both regional (pan-Asian) and global questions and problems. We will bring issues of access, ethics, researcher-status, language and politics to this roundtable, seeking to cross-reference and compare experiences, best practice and protocols.What is fieldwork and who does it? Why is it necessary and what are its limitations? The panel represents research practices ranging from social studies, policy studies, empirical humanities and anthropology, and discusses both the precepts and the expectations within which field work is designed and implemented. The researchers are all closely engaged with specific Asian subject matters and population groups, although their work may be of relevance and import to both regional (pan-Asian) and global questions and problems. We will bring issues of access, ethics, researcher-status, language and politics to this roundtable, seeking to cross-reference and compare experiences, best practice and protocols.
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04.05.2013

BOOK LAUNCH: Creative Industries in China: Art, Design Media

The Tier 4 in Asian Creative Transformations presents:

Michael Keane in conversation with China media and culture specialist Stephanie Hemelryk Donald to launch his book Creative Industries in China: Art, Design Media.

When: Friday, 10 May 2013, 12 noon - 2pm

Where: Queensland University of Technology

Are Chinese people less creative than citizens of the ‘free world’? Can Chinese people think creatively? Professor Michael Keane’s new book, Creative Industries in China explores how Chinese policy makers, artists, designers and media practitioners are changing a widespread perception that China is an uncreative nation. This raises an important issue - creativity varies in different societies at different periods. So what kind of criteria should one use to measure it? And how applicable is this ‘gold standard’ Western concept of creativity, and creative industries, to the People’s Republic of China?

Professor Michael Keane is a Principal Research Fellow at the Centre for Creative Industries and Innovation, and director of Asian Creative Transformations Tier 4 Research Cluster

RSVP is essential as this event will be catered. Please RSVP to: infocci@qut.edu.au by Wednesday 8 May

The Tier 4 in Asian Creative Transformations presents a book launch: Michael
Keane, “Creative Industries in China: Art, Design Media” 
> In conversation with China media and culture specialist Stephanie Hemelryk Donald,
UNSW
> 
> Are Chinese people less creative than citizens of the ‘free world’? Can Chinese
people think creatively? Professor Michael Keane’s new book, “Creative Industries
in China” explores how Chinese policy makers, artists, designers and media
practitioners are changing a widespread perception that China is an uncreative
nation. This raises an important issue - creativity varies in different societies
at different periods. So what kind of criteria should one use to measure it? And
how applicable is this ‘gold standard’ Western concept of creativity, and creative
industries, to the People’s Republic of China? 
> 
> Professor Michael Keane is a Principal Research Fellow at the Centre for Creative
Industries and Innovation, and director of Asian Creative Transformations Tier 4
Research Cluster
>  
>  
> RSVP is essential as this event will be catered.  Please RSVP to:
infocci@qut.edu.au by Wednesday 8 Ma

The Tier 4 in Asian Creative Transformations presents a book launch: Michael

Keane, “Creative Industries in China: Art, Design Media”

> In conversation with China media and culture specialist Stephanie Hemelryk Donald,

UNSW

>

> Are Chinese people less creative than citizens of the ‘free world’? Can Chinese

people think creatively? Professor Michael Keane’s new book, “Creative Industries

in China” explores how Chinese policy makers, artists, designers and media

practitioners are changing a widespread perception that China is an uncreative

nation. This raises an important issue - creativity varies in different societies

at different periods. So what kind of criteria should one use to measure it? And

how applicable is this ‘gold standard’ Western concept of creativity, and creative

industries, to the People’s Republic of China?

>

> Professor Michael Keane is a Principal Research Fellow at the Centre for Creative

Industries and Innovation, and director of Asian Creative Transformations Tier 4

Research Cluster

>

>

> RSVP is essential as this event will be catered. Please RSVP to:

infocci@qut.edu.au by Wednesday 8 May

y
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06.12.2012

'Forced inertia: mobility, interruption and stasis in Little Moth (Peng Tao)'

In this presentation, Stephanie will explore the cinematic child in a number of films where the child is rendered literally inert - through injury, sickness or death.

Monday, 3 December, 11.30

Whitley Suite, Evans Library, Texas A&M University

Click here to view poster.

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29.11.2012

Defining Ephemera Conference

Stephanie will present 'Defining Loss: The Childish Poetics of Ephemera' at the Defining Ephemera Conference at the Chao Center for Asian Studies, Rice University, Houston TX on 8 December.

Click here to view conference schedule and venue details

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15.10.2012

Seminar: Urban Inertia: cinema, the dying, and the dead

Stephanie will present 'Urban Inertia' as part of the School of International Film Studies Seminar Series.

When: Tuesday, 23 November 2012, 3-4.30pm

Where: UNSW, Matthews Building, Rm 125

The argument of this paper derives from my viewing of a recent British film Dreams of a Life (Carol Morley, 2011). Mainly concerned with urban issues of anomie, race, domestic violence and the loneliness of death, the film led me to other films with similar intersecting themes. These include, Claire Denis' I Cant Sleep (J'ai pas sommeil, 1994), and Alain Gomis' Today (2011). In all three films the protagonist is seen as an outsider and - for very different reasons - associated with death or violence, lonely but at the heart of urban bustle. Considering these films together, however, I also begun to see that the focus on death in these texts presented a surprising view of inertia, both visually and conceptually. Whether through the presence of a corpse, or other organic remains, or even the through idea of such, the affect of these stories is contingent, for me, on inert matter.

Click here to download poster.

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04.10.2012

Children in Film: a mini film festival

The mini film festival ‘The Child on Film’ is a joint initiative of world cinema researchers in UNSW Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, and Stephanie Donald's ARC Future Fellowship  project Migration and Mobility: the question of childhood in Chinese and European cinema since 1945 (aka 'the Dorothy Project').

When: 26th to the 28th of October 2012

Friday 26th : 4:30 – 9:00 pm (Popi and A Family in Crisis: The Elián González Story)

Saturday 27th : 10 am – 5:30 pm (ToomelahLittle Moth and The Tree of Life)

Sunday 28th : 2:30  - 6 pm (Blind Pig Who Wants to Fly and Taking Off)

Where: Room G327, Robert Webster, the University of New South Wales

Click here to download poster.

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09.08.2012

Pacific Triangles : Australia, China and the Reorientation of American Studies

When: Friday 10 and Saturday 11 August 2012

Where: United States Study Centre, The University of Sydney

Convened by Paul Giles (English) and  Jane Park (Cultural Studies), in association with the U. S. Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, this symposium brings together scholars from around the world working within and across American Studies, Asian Studies and Asian diasporic studies, to look not only at shifting relationships between the Chinese mainland and the West, but also how these shifts resonate in the Asia Pacific region (i.e. Australasia, Southeast Asia and East Asia). In the process, the symposium takes the transnational turn in American Studies outside the national boundaries and ideological frameworks of the US. At the same time, it attempts to promote intercultural dialogue around the ongoing processes of de-imperialization and decolonization throughout the Pacific Rim in the post-9/11 era.

Stephanie will chair Panel A: American Studies in the 'Asian Century', 9.45-11am, Friday 10 August.

Click here to download the symposium schedule

Click here to go to the symposium website

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29.06.2012

Markets Workshop at RMIT

Markets as sites of flows, technologies, and social and affective connection and innovation: a comparative transnational approach

When: Thursday 19 July 2012, 10.30am - 6.00pm (dinner at 7.00 pm at 400 Gradi, Brunswick East)

Where: RMIT University Campus, Bulding 9, Level 3, Room 8

Click here  to download schedule.

Participants:
Prof. Stephanie Hemelryk Donald (UNSW)
Dr Ayxem Eli (UNSW)
Dr Clifton Evers (University of Nottingham, Ningbo)
Dr Katie Hepworth (UTS), Prof. Maurizio Marinelli (UTS)
A/Prof. Thomas Mical (UniSA), Dr Masa Mikola (RMIT)
Dr Kirsten Seale (RMIT)
Prof. Dunfu Zhang (Shanghai University)
Brian Risby (Planning Institute of Australia, TAS)
Daphne Lowe Kelley (President, Chinese Heritage Association of Australia.

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06.04.2012

Re-telling Chinese History on Film: A Leverhulme Lecture

Stephanie will be presenting a lecture supported by the Leverhulme Trust in April.

Leeds University Centre for World Cinemas Leverhulme Lecture:

'Re-telling Chinese History on Film: the Qingming Scroll and Jia Zhangke's 24 City'

When: Tuesday 24 April 2012, 5.30pm

Where: University of Leeds, Parkinson Building,  (1.08)

Seats are limited - please reserve your place now with Helen Costelloe: H.Costelloe@leeds.ac.uk

Download poster here.

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21.03.2012

Stephanie to give Keynote address at 'Welcoming Strangers'

‘Welcoming Strangers’ is an international, interdisciplinary postgraduate conference on migration, mobility, identity, and globalisation, taking place in April at Royal Holloway, London.

Emeritus Professor Robin Cohen, Former Director of the International Migration Institute, University of Oxford and Principal Investigator of the Leverhulme-funded Oxford Diasporas Programme, and Professor Stephanie Hemelryk Donald are the two keynote speakers for the event.

Welcoming Strangers takes place on 27 April 2012

At: Windsor Building, Royal Holloway, University of London, Surrey, UK

Click here to visit the conference website.

 

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16.03.2012

Inert Cities Symposium program now available

The full program for the Inert Cities: Globalization, Mobility and Interruption Symposium (University of London, 8 May 2012) is now available.

Click here to download the program.

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04.02.2012

Symposium - Inert Cities: Globalization, Mobility and Interruption

With Christoph Lindner (University of Amsterdam), and the support of the Leverhulme Trust, Stephanie is organiser of:

Inert Cities: Globalization, Mobility and Interruption

When: Tuesday 8 May 2012, 9.30am - 6.30pm

Where: University of London, Seng Tee Lee Seminar Room, Senate House, Malet St

RSVP to stephi@stephaniedonald.info or c.p.lindner@uva.nl

Download poster here.

 

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04.02.2012

The Leverhulme Trust: four upcoming lectures

Stephanie will be presenting four talks supported by the Leverhulme Trust in February this year:

Leeds University Union East Asian Research Society (EARS) presents:

'Film and Media: Reconsidering Chinese History through Memory'

When: Tuesday 7 February 2012, 6pm - 7.30pm

Where: University of Leeds, Michael Sadler Building,  Rupert Beckett Rm (LG.04)

Download poster here.

Exeter University Centre for Interdisciplinary Film Research presents:

'Markets and the Political Poster in Chinese Film'

When: Friday 10 February 2012, 1pm

Where: Exeter University Streatham Campus, Queen's Building, LT1

Download Poster here.

University of Leeds Centre for World Cinemas presents:

'The Dorothy Complex: Children and Migration in World Cinema'

When: Tuesday 14 February 2012, 5.30pm

Where: University of Leeds, Parkinson Building (1.08)

Download poster here.

King's College London presents:

'Older people's reflections on media use in 20th and 21st century China'

When: Wednesday 22 February 2012, 4-6pm

Where: Room S0.12, Strand Campus King's College London.

Click here for more info.

 

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13.01.2012

Contemporary China Studies Program lecture - Oxford University

With the support of the Leverhulme Trust, Stephanie will present a lecture at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, Oxford University, on

Thursday 19 January 2012, 2pm

11 Bevington Road, Oxford

Click here to download flyer.

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13.01.2012

Stephanie to speak at King's College, London

Stephanie will present a talk on 'Older people's reflections on media use in 20th and 21st century China' on

Wednesday 22 February 2012, 4-6pm

Room S0.12, Strand Campus King's College London.

Click here for more info.

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26.09.2011

Intimate Publics Forum

As social, geo-social and mobile media render the intimate public and the public intimate, how does it impact on art practice and politics?

Stephanie will be speaking at this FREE public forum:

Tuesday, 16 October 2011

6-8pm

Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room,
Level 1, Sidney Myer Asia Centre, The University of Melbourne

Click here to download poster.

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16.08.2011

Free public lecture: Media Fragmentation, Party Systems and Democracy

Professor Paolo Mancini, University of Perugia and Visiting Fellow with the ERC-funded project on Media and Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe will present a free public lecture on the issues surrounding media fragmentation that impact both party systems, and forms of democracy. 

Date: 31 August 2011

Time: 6.30-8.30pm

Venue: Theatrette, State Library of Victoria, 3 LaTrobe Street, Melbourne

Registration essential (for catering purposes). Email: eucentre@rmit.edu.au

Download pdf flyer here.

and Opening Keynote speaker at the Media, Communication and Democracy: Global
and National Environments conference, 31 August - 2 September 2011. Visit the conference site for more details.

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16.08.2011

Inaugural annual conference: Media, Communication and Democracy: Global and National Environments

The EU Centre at RMIT University with the School of Media and Communication (RMIT) and Media and Democracy in Eastern Europe Research Project (MDCEE) (University of Oxford, UK) invite you to attend the Centre's inaugural annual conference.

Dates: 31 August, 1-2 September 2011

Venue: Storey Hall at the city campus of RMIT University, Swanston Street, Melbourne

For registration and details visit www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=49g59cm3qkgi

Media, Communication and Democracy: Global and National Environments - Inaugural annual conference

The EU Centre at RMIT University with the School of Media and Communication (RMIT) and Media and Democracy in Eastern Europe Research Project (MDCEE) (University of Oxford, UK) invite you to attend the Centre's inaugural annual conference.


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07.03.2011

Stephanie to give Keynote address at PIA 2011

On Monday 7 March 2011, Stephanie will give a Keynote address at the Planning Institute of Australia 2011 Congress.

Framing the Child: A Filmic Perspective on Mobility in Urban Landscapes

Monday 7 March 2011
Plenary session 2, 11.00 am, Concert Hall
Hotel Grand Chancellor, Hobart, Tasmania

Download the programme

Click here for more information from the PIA website (www.planning.org.au)

 

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18.02.2011

Missing histories and childhood in the Cultural Revolution - 3 March

Don't miss Stephanie's presentation:

Missing histories and childhood in the Cultural Revolution

12–1 pm Thursday 3 March 2011

RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne

FREE event - please book your seat on (03) 9925 1717

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18.02.2011

Global Oprah Conference, 25-26 February 2011

Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Yale presents:

Global Oprah: Celebrity as Transnational Icon

Friday 25 and Saturday 26 February 2011

Yale University, Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Avenue, Room 203

For more information, email kathryn.lofton@yale.edu, or visit yale.edu/wgss

Download poster here.

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18.02.2011

Yale seminar, 24 February 2011

On Thursday, February 24, the programs in Film, and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Yale will be hosting a lunchtime seminar (from 11:30-12:45 in WLH 309) with Stephanie Helmelryk Donald. 

At this lunch, participants will discuss Stephanie's essays 'Women reading Chinese films: between Orientalism and silence' and 'Tang Wei: Sex, the City, and the Scapegoat in Lust, Caution' that address her work on Asian cinema. To reserve your place, please email kathryn.lofton@yale.edu.  Lunch will be provided.

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16.12.2010

Shen Jiawei in conversation

Don't miss artist Shen Jiawei, in conversation with Stephanie Donald

The fate of a painting and artists in the Cultural Revolution
RMIT Gallery 12–1 pm Friday 21 January 2011

FREE event - all welcome

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16.12.2010

"China and Revolution" comes to Melbourne

The ARC, University of Westminster and RMIT Gallery present:

China and Revolution: History, Parody and Memory in Contemporary Art

21 January - 19 March 2011

RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston St, Melbourne

Grand opening: 3 February 2011, 6-8pm

Download invitiation here

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10.12.2010

Politics of World Cinema Symposium

University of Sydney, Mills Building
13-14 December 2010.

Presented in collaboration with: The World Universities Network, the White Rose Consortium and the School of Media and Communication, RMIT. Keynote Speakers: Associate Professor Tim Bergfelder (University of Southampton, UK) and Professor Stephanie Hemelryk Donald.

Click here to download at-a-glance program.

Click here to download full symposium flyer.

For more information and registration, contact Jennifer Beckett: j.beckett@usyd.edu.au



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10.12.2010

Wising Up: how to study mobile media in an age of smart phones

RMIT University, Melbourne

Building 9, level 3, room 10

Friday 17th December 2010

An ARC Research Network Cultural Technologies node event, headed by mobile media expert, Ilpo Koskinen, and organised by Larissa Hjorth, Screen migrations, and Stephanie Hemelryk Donald.

This workshop explores ways to study mobile media, especially in light of the rise of smart phones. No longer a mere telecommunication, the mobile phone has expanded to encompass various forms of multimedia and technocultural activities. MP3 player, social media portal, games console and camera are but a few of the many forms of media practice afforded by mobile media. And as we move into an era of smart phones, issues such as GPS and other locative media need to be considered. Click here to download workshop program and venue details.

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